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Lower Mortgage Rates

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mortgage broker Lower Mortgage RatesIf you’re in the market for a new mortgage and are searching for lower mortgage rates, there are several things you need to know about the rate quotes you receive. Many homeowners think that comparing offers from several different lenders is all they need to get the best deal; however, what most people don’t understand is that they are simply comparing retail mortgage rates with the same markup. If you really want lower mortgage rates you’ll need to find someone willing to offer you wholesale rates without paying garbage fees. Here are several tips to help you refinance your mortgage with a wholesale mortgage rate and save thousands of dollars in the process.

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What Are Wholesale Mortgage Rates?

Wholesale mortgage rates are offered by a certain type of mortgage lender that does not do business with the public directly. These wholesale mortgage lenders offer their best rates to mortgage brokers and other retail mortgage companies that sell loans to the public for a commission. Many people think that by contacting one of these lenders directly they can refinance with a wholesale rate; however, wholesale lenders have retail branches that deal with the public and do not offer wholesale mortgage rates. In order to refinance your loan with a wholesale rate you’ll need to enlist the help of an honest mortgage broker willing to give you access to these rates.

Mortgage Brokers Work For a Commission

The problem with refinancing your home loan with a mortgage broker comes from the way that brokers are compensated. Mortgage brokers are paid for their services in two ways. Most brokers charge you an origination fee for their services. This fee could be one percent or more of your loan amount; however, one percent is a reasonable amount to pay for your mortgage broker’s services. The second method your broker receives compensation is from kickbacks the lender pays for overcharging you with your mortgage interest rate. Many brokers mark up the mortgage rate you qualified because lenders pay a commission of one percent for every .25% they overcharge you. This commission is called Yield Spread Premium and is the reason that most homeowners overpay when refinancing their mortgage loans.

Yield Spread Premium Can Be Avoided When Refinancing

Most brokers get defensive or even angry when questioned about Yield Spread Premium. And why wouldn’t they? This markup of your mortgage interest rate can double, even triple their commission on your loan. You can avoid paying a higher mortgage rate with Yield Spread Premium by finding a mortgage broker willing to work for the origination fee alone, without this kickback from the mortgage lender.

Shop Around For Honest Mortgage Brokers

You can start your search for an honest broker to refinance your mortgage by searching the Internet for an “Upfront Mortgage Broker” in your state. Upfront mortgage brokers charge a flat fee for loan origination without charging Yield Spread Premium on your loan. The Upfront Mortgage Broker’s Association maintains a registry of brokers on their website upfrontmortgagebrokers.org that is categorized by State.

If there are no members in your State you can find the right broker by contacting mortgage brokers found in the phone book. Start by telling these brokers that you understand Yield Spread Premium and will not accept any loan offers that include this markup.

It is usually easier to negotiate this type of deal with a mortgage broker that has their own business as those working for a large brokerage firm may not have the authority to give you the deal you are looking for. You can learn more about finding the right kind of mortgage broker to refinance your home loan without paying Yield Spread Premium and other garbage fees by requesting a free mortgage refinancing DVD.

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